Restaurant Review: Flower Brook Mifen House

Details: Located at 44-35 Kissena Blvd, Flushing, NY 11355. I couldn’t find the official site so here’s the Yelp page: https://www.yelp.com/biz/flower-brook-mifen-house-flushing

I came here one day on a whim. There’s a lot of places in Flushing that sell Chinese ramen or noodle soup. Flower Brook Mifen House is another such place.

I ordered the beef noodle soup, which was around eight dollars. The meat was cut into small cubes and the noodles were okay, but didn’t stay firm for long. They let you choose how spicy you want it and it can get pretty spicy. The spice they use is the numbing, Sichuan kind, not just hot.

Overall, it was okay. I think that if you had to choose between the beef noodle soup here and the beef noodle soup from the nearby Red Mountain Noodle House, the Red Mountain Noodle House’s noodles were easily better. Better noodles and broth. If you’re in the area, go to the Red Mountain Noodle House instead. However, if you like overly spicy food, this place isn’t terrible.

Score: 5/10

Restaurant Review: Fu Yuan

WP_20170723_001Details: Located at 135-43 Roosevelt Ave, Flushing, NY 11355. I couldn’t find an official page so here’s the Yelp page: http://www.yelp.com/biz/fu-yuan-富源腸粉店-flushing

I’ve walked by this place many times and I have never seen it without a line, at least when it’s open. I have no idea when the hours are but they are narrow. When this is place is open, its popularity cannot be denied.

Fu Yuan mostly serves rice rolls. That’s traditional, Chinese, steamed, soft rolls of white rice dough that many Chinese people grew up eating. You can get some with the classic oyster sauce and peanut butter sauce. You can also get toppings like fish balls and some other things I can’t recall, but plain rice rolls is generally how it’s eaten. The price ranges from around two to three dollars for a serving. It’s a small store front so don’t expect anyplace to stand or sit.

Overall, it’s okay. I think the primary attraction of this place is to all the Chinese people who grew up eating this stuff. This place sells nostalgia. For people who didn’t grow up eating this stuff, they eat it for the food credibility, for the ability to brag about eating something quintessentially Chinese. As someone who doesn’t care to brag about eating rice rolls and who did not grow up eating this stuff, I feel no compulsion to shower praises on this place. The food was okay. It was just okay. Rice rolls in general are just okay.

Score: 5.5/10

Restaurant Review: Chef’s Table at Brooklyn Fare

 

Details: Located at 200 Schermerhorn St, Brooklyn, NY 11201. The food is a combination of French, American, and Asian influences.

After reading an article on how incredibly racist Cesar Ramirez at Chef’s table is toward Chinese people, I thought to offer testimony as to my experience at the restaurant.

For those unfamiliar, Chef’s Table is (at the time I wrote this) one of only a handful of three-starred Michelin restaurants in the United States (there are around ten in the country), one of seven of such restaurants in New York City, and the only one in Brooklyn. The Michelin star is currently the gold standard in restaurant reviews and three stars is the most anyone can get.

Of note is the set up. The restaurant only seats around eighteen people with nine people per serving (Momofuku Ko has a similar set up, but has since lost its three star rating). Reservations are taken at least thirty days in advance (and only on Mondays) unless there are vacancies. The reservation system is somewhat standard for restaurants of this type and cost. Speaking of costs, everything is paid before the meal with total costs being around 300 US dollars (at the time of my meal).

The food is a combination of French haute and Japanese, a fusion. Dishes range from roast squab and truffles to sea urchin and Wagyu beef. They only serve dinner ( and only a couple of servings per  night). Dinner consists of fifteen to twenty relatively small dishes meant to showcase the Chef’s ability. The menu changes periodically depending on what chef Ramirez wants to do.

Now for my experience.

Arrival was fine and the staff was nice. The setting is intimate as you can see the kitchen and all food being prepared. What was disheartening was the rule against note taking and pictures. Afterwards, chef Ramirez would tell us that pictures were banned because of an unfavorable article written about him using a picture. I read somewhere else that note taking was to prevent people stealing his recipes. It sort of felt like being in kindergarten.

The food was very good, and may be the best meal I’ve ever had. Everything was delicious, but a few dishes were especially noteworthy.

The imported uni on toasted brioche with truffle sauce and a slice of truffle on top is something I will never forget. It was my favorite thing on the menu. I could have eaten twenty of those. Maybe more.

The chawanmushi with foie gras was interesting. The soup was almost entirely clarified butter.

The truffle cream risotto was the most comforting dish I’ve ever had.

The shiso sorbet was refreshing.

The wagyu beef… tasted like a very tasty sponge. With citrus.

In regards to who our fellow eaters were, seven out of the nine people on my side of the table were of Asian descent, likely Chinese. Two seemed to be fellow chef friends. Two others were regulars who were on their fifth visit to Chef’s Table. If Chef Ramirez hates the Chinese, he certainly didn’t show it then. He was reserved, but courteous.

Even more surprising, treatment of another class of individual was also  fairly respectful: VEGETARIANS. From what I observed, their food was also delicious (Chef’s Table accommodates vegetarians; don’t know about complete vegans) and they were treated no different from other customers.

Score: 8.8/10 Great meal, but I doubt I will ever return. There are other Michelin starred restaurants to visit.

Edit: Here’s a fast and dirty list of dishes, not in any order. It was written down from memory.

Uni with black truffle on brioche, chawanmushi with foie gras and seafood, oyster with truffle (mushroom gravy), Shiso ice cream, wagyu with daikon, turbo with green pea, koti kashi (rice) with black truffle, two sashimi dishes, two cooked dishes, caviar with cauliflower, lobster (not so good), soba tea ice cream, spiced iced cream with sugar globe, petite fours, and squab.